Bear Creek Provincial Park

South of Fintry is Bear Creek Provincial Park. If you are interested in enjoying Bear Creek Provincial Park, you can launch your boat at Fintry boat launch and boat over to Bear Creek. While Bear Creek does not have a boat launch, you can easily park your boat overnight in their Mooring Area behind the Buoy Lines. You can carry your camping supplies into the campsite and pitch your tent in one of their many camp areas. (Note: Tent Prices are same as RV parking @ $35 a night per party.)

Ellison Provincial Park

(Description Provided by http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/ellison/)
Nestled on the northeastern shore of Okanagan Lake, Ellison Provincial Park includes 220 hectares of forested benchlands above a rocky shoreline of scenic headlands and sheltered coves.

The park’s natural attractions, combined with the dry, sunny Okanagan climate provide many recreational opportunities from spring through fall. Hiking trails along the scenic headlands are steep and require care and attention.

Penticton Marina

Penticton is one of the greatest places to boat in the Okanagan. Penticton sits in a rich tourist community, from the shores of Okanagan Lake Beach, to the small winery community of Naramata and also the various parks of Summerland. Penticton’s beautiful beachfront houses various restaurants as well as nearby downtown with many shops and services. Penticton Yacht Club also sits on eastern shores of Okanagan Lake Beach, which has many great boating services including two boat launches, fueling & docking station and also access to general facilities. Check out www.pycmarina.com for visitor’s moorage which is available on a daily, weekly or monthly basis or call (250) 770-2000 for rates or reservations.

Alongside the South Okanagan’s east shores lies the small community of Naramata, home to many wineries which is great for wine tasting and dining during the warm summer evenings. Along with excellent wineries Naramata has an excellent community for tourism as well as a yacht club to dock your boat and visit the small beach community.

Across the lake from Naramata there are many parks, beaches and boat launches in Summerland including Peach Orchard Park, Sun Oka Beach and Kickininee Provincial Park. These parks include docks which you can enjoy swimming or have lunch on the beach. Kickininee Park also has a boat launch for easy access to load and unload boats while saving the time to drive into Penticton if coming from Summerland.

Penticton Marina is at the Southern most end of Okanagan Lake in Penticton. The marina has all the amenities. Check out www.pycmarina.com for visitor’s moorage which is available on a daily, weekly or monthly basis or call (250) 770-2000 for rates or reservations.

The Blue Herron Waterfront Pub and Restaurant

Location: East shore of Lake Okanagan in Vernon. Approximately 50km North of Kelowna.

The Blue Herron is the only place in Vernon that you will find a full service boating option. They offer moorage for their guests if one chooses to fill up on food at the restaurant. While, if you are concerned about the journey back or as just a little low from touring all day, the Herron offers a gas dock to ensure you will get to where you want to go.

Summerland Yacht Club

At Summerland Yacht Club, enjoy a boat launch, Boathouse Bar and Grill and fuel for your boat.
Summer Office Hours
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Contact Info
P: 250-494-8312
F: 1-778-728-0773

Surfing behind a boat with Kelowna Boat Rentals

Wakesurfing is a water sport in which a rider trails behind a boat, riding the boat’s wake, without being directly pulled by the boat.
You get up on the wake, typically using tow rope to pull you out of the water. More advanced riders will start on the swim platform with their board resting on the edge and once the boat is up to speed the rider will ease themselves back until the find the “sweet spot” of the wave. Once the sweet spot is found the rider can let go of the rope and continue to surf hands free. In general wakesurfing is done by using special boards, designed specifically for wakes. Wake surfs range from 4’6 – 6′ whereas surfboards for the ocean range from 6′ – 12′.
The boats that are preferred are tournament boats, which are inboard ski boats with direct drives as the propeller is under the boat, it is nearly impossible for the rider to make contact with the propellor. These boats are also made so that you can hold extra ballast systems, such as water, lead weights, concrete, or other heavy objects in different sections of the boat in order to weigh the boat down and create a larger wake. The ideal wake for surfing is created by positioning people and ballasts throughout the boat with the majority of the weight being in the back and on the side that is being surfed. The deeper the boat sits in the water the bigger and better the wake. When surfing, you only need to travel at about 12 mph making it very laid back and fun for all ages!

Beside the technical aspect (and most importantly) this sport is just a lot of fun when you get the hang of it suited for all ages and it really is not as hard as it seems.

I have gotten this off Wikepedia:

Many riders perform a wide array of maneuvers or specifically-named ‘tricks’ while wakesurfing, with most owing their origins to surfing, skating (both vert and street) and snowboarding, Some of the most well-known tricks are:

Pumping – Turning up and down the face of the wake to gain speed.
Stalling – Applying pressure to your back foot to slow down or “stall”.
Floater – When a rider and board “floats” on top of the wake.
Lip slide – Just like a floater, but the board is sideways.
Spray – Gouging into the face of the wake to create the water under you to explode and spray.
Fire Hydrant – Placing one hand on the board and taking your front foot off.
Posing – Doing hand and body positions while riding for cool style points.
Hang 5 – Rider extends front foot (toes) over front of board.
Rail Grabs – Grabbing the board’s rail while the board is on the wake – one or both hands.
Cutbacks – Bashing off the lip of the wake with the board – the more extreme and risky the better.
Paddle back in – Going to the extreme rear of the wake, throwing down on the board and paddling back into the power zone. This can also be done by pulling the outside rail of the board to bring it back to the power zone.
Tubing It – Throwing down on the board and sliding back into the tube until covered up the deeper the better, and then popping out and standing back up on the board.
Switch Stance – Riding with the opposite foot forward.
180 spin – Spinning 180 on the wake – Board and rider spin.
Airs – Launching off the lip with board into the air and landing back on the wake (toeside or heelside).
One Hand Grab Air – Grabbing one rail of the board while the board is airborne above the wake.
Double Grab Air – Grabbing both rails of the board while the board is airborne above the wake.
Hang 10 – Rider extends both feet (toes) over end of board.
360 spin – Spinning 360 on the face of the wake – Board and rider spin.
540 spin – Rider spins continuously 1 1/2 times until he is riding switch stance forward.
Rider spins continuously 2 complete 360′s.
Air 180 – Doing an air while spinning 180 the blind direction.
180 air – Doing and air and spinning a 180 in the air and landing in with a switch stance.
180 shove it – Spinning just the board 180 under your feet and landing with the board “backwards”.
900 spin – Rider spins continuously 2 1/2 times until he is riding switch stance forward.
360 shove it – Same as a 180 but you spin the board a full 360 under your feet. Note: rider does not spin only the board spins.
Big Spin – Same as a 360 shove it, only the rider spins a 180 at the same time the board does a 360.